‘One minute felt like one year’: A day in the life of inmates in the Xinjiang internment camps

The alarm rings at 5am every morning in Yerzhan’s overcrowded concrete cell. He dresses in a thin blue uniform before armed guards escort him to a bathroom, where he has minutes to wash under supervision.

Kairat Samarkan, 30, an ethnic Kazakh, who was detained for almost four months in an internment camp in Xinjiang Province, China, demonstrates a stress position used to discipline him while at the camp CREDIT: SAM TARLING/SAM TARLINGAt 7am there is breakfast: tea and a single steamed bun for each of the cell’s 18 inmates. For the rest of the day, Yerzhan is forced to sit straight on a stool, learn Mandarin, sing patriotic songs and memorise ruling Communist Party ideology.  In order to receive a small portion of rice at noon and 6pm he, like all the others, must praise the Chinese president and shout “Long live Xi Jinping!”.  Those who refuse are electrocuted with a cattle prod that causes their limbs to spasm uncontrollably. …READ THE FULL ARTICLE ON THE TELEGRAPH